•  Anti-Racism Resources

    Name Synopsis Type

    Lucky Zip Codes

     

    How are our lives shaped by the zip code we’re born into? Who gets to be lucky? Does it matter if I live in 63103, 63130, 63112, 63121, 63145, 63105? What will it take for us to live in a world where destiny is more than geography? St. Louis needs to look inward after the events in Ferguson. As director of racial justice for YWCA Metro St. Louis, Amy Hunter is responsible for ensuring that eliminating racism. Part of the YWCA’s two-prong mission of eliminating racism and empowering women, is incorporated in all of the organization’s internal and external programming. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Video - Ted Talk

    We Live Here

     

    We Live Here explores the issues of race, class and power that led to the emotional eruption in the wake of Michael Brown's shooting death in Ferguson. St. Louis Public Radio reporters Tim Lloyd and Kameel Stanley present podcasts, radio features, web stories and use social media for an in-depth exploration of how systemic racism impacts people as well as the well-being of our region and beyond. Podcast

    Race: The Power of an Illusion

     

    What is this thing we call race? Where did the idea come from? “Race: The Power of an Illusion” compels viewers to examine some of their most fundamental beliefs about concepts of race.

    1. The Difference Between Us
    Episode one in this three-part series follows a dozen students, including African American athletes and Asian American string players, who sequence and compare their own DNA. The results surprise them—and us—when they discover their closest genetic matches are as likely to be with people from other “races” as their own. Much of this episode is devoted to understanding why. Looking at skin color differences, disease, human evolution, even genetic traits, we learn there’s not one characteristic, one trait, or even a single gene that distinguishes all members of one “race” from another. One by one, our myths about race—including “natural” superiority and inferiority—are taken apart.

    2. The Story We Tell
    The second episode in this series questions the belief that race has always been with us. Ancient peoples stigmatized “others” based on language, customs, and especially religion, but they did not sort people into “races.” This episode traces the race concept to the European conquest of the Americas, including the development of the first slave system, where all slaves shared a physical trait: dark skin. Ironically, it was not until slavery was challenged on moral grounds that early prejudices—emboldened by the need to defend slavery in a nation that professed a deep belief in freedom—crystallized into a full-blown ideology of white supremacy. By the mid-19th century, race had become the “common sense” wisdom of white America, explaining everything from individual behavior to the fate of whole societies.

    3. The House We Live In
    This final episode focuses not only on individual behaviors and attitudes, but also on how our institutions shape and create race, giving different groups vastly unequal life chances. Who is white? In the early 20th century, the answer was not always clear. Often, the courts had to decide, and they resorted to contradictory logic to maintain the color line. After World War II, whiteness increasingly meant owning a home in the suburbs, aided by discriminatory federal policies that helped whites and hindered nonwhites. European “ethnics,” once considered not quite white, blended together as they reaped the advantages of whiteness—including increased equity as property values rose dramatically—while African Americans and other nonwhites were locked out. Forty years after the Civil Rights Movement, the playing field is still not level, and “colorblind” policies only perpetuate these inequities.
    3 part Video Series, 1 hour each $2.99 per episode, $4.99 for all 3

    Witnessing Whiteness by Shelly Tochluk

     

    Witnessing Whiteness invites readers to consider what it means to be white, describes and critiques strategies used to avoid race issues, and identifies the detrimental effect of avoiding race on cross-race collaborations. The author illustrates how racial discomfort leads white people toward poor relationships with people of color. Questioning the implications our history has for personal lives and social institutions, the book considers political, economic, socio-cultural, and legal histories that shaped the meanings associated with whiteness. Drawing on dialogue with well-known figures within education, race, and multicultural work, the book offers intimate, personal stories of cross-race friendships that address both how a deep understanding of whiteness supports cross-race collaboration and the long-term nature of the work of excising racism from the deep psyche. Concluding chapters offer practical information on building knowledge, skills, capacities, and communities that support anti-racism practices, a hopeful look at our collective future, and a discussion of how to create a culture of witnesses who support allies for social and racial justice. Book, moderated discussion group - YWCA Program

    Waking Up White by Debby Irving

     

    For twenty-five years, Debby Irving sensed inexplicable racial tensions in her personal and professional relationships. As a colleague and neighbor, she worried about offending people she dearly wanted to befriend. As an arts administrator, she didn't understand why her diversity efforts lacked traction. As a teacher, she found her best efforts to reach out to students and families of color left her wondering what she was missing. Then, in 2009, one "aha!" moment launched an adventure of discovery and insight that drastically shifted her worldview and upended her life plan. In Waking Up White, Irving tells her often cringe-worthy story with such openness that readers will turn every page rooting for her-and ultimately for all of us Book

    White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo

     

    In this “vital, necessary, and beautiful book” (Michael Eric Dyson), antiracist educator Robin DiAngelo deftly illuminates the phenomenon of white fragility and “allows us to understand racism as a practice not restricted to ‘bad people’ (Claudia Rankine). Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent any meaningful cross-racial dialogue. In this in-depth exploration, DiAngelo examines how white fragility develops, how it protects racial inequality, and what we can do to engage more constructively. Book

    White Kids: Growing Up with Privilege in a Racially Divided America by Margaret Hagerman

     

    White Kids, based on two years of research involving in-depth interviews with white kids and their families, is a clear-eyed and sometimes shocking account of how white kids learn about race. In doing so, this book explores questions such as, “How do white kids learn about race when they grow up in families that do not talk openly about race or acknowledge its impact?” and “What about children growing up in families with parents who consider themselves to be ‘anti-racist’?” Book
    The Making of Ferguson by Richard Rothstein SECTIONS
    Executive summary
    How Ferguson Became Ferguson
    Federal, state, and local policy segregated Ferguson and St. Louis
    Examining the distinct public policies that have enforced segregation
    Public labor market policy contributing to segregation
    In conclusion: Understanding segregation’s causes suggests remedies
    Downloadable PDF

    The Case for Reparations by Ta-Nehisi Coates

     

      Essay

    The hidden racism of young white Americans

     

      Article

    We treat racism like it’s going extinct. It’s not.

     

      Article

    Ferguson Commission Report

     

      Downloadable PDF
    Dismantling the Divide   Downloadable PDF

    All My Relations

     

    On each episode hosts Matika Wilbur (Tulalip and Swinomish) and Adrienne Keene (Cherokee Nation), delve into a different topic facing Native peoples today, bringing in guests from all over Indian Country to offer perspectives and stories. We dive deep, play some games, laugh a lot, cry sometimes, and hope that you’ll join us on this journey together.

    The podcast came from a desire to have more Indigenous voices accessible in mainstream media—both Matika and Adrienne are surrounded every day in life and work by brilliant Native folks who are fighting and resisting settler colonialism, while also celebrating and uplifting their communities and cultures. The majority of Americans never see this side of Indian Country, and instead only see stereotypical Hollywood Indians set in the historic past or sad, dark poverty porn. We want to offer an alternative, to move beyond bland stereotypes and misrepresentations, and engage in the messy, beautiful, and complicated parts of being Indigenous. We want this space to be for everyone—for Native folks to laugh, to hear ourselves reflected, and give us a chance to think deeper about some of the biggest issues facing our communities, and for non-Native folks to listen and learn.
    podcast

    UnCivil

     

    Uncivil brings you stories that were left out of the official history of the Civil War, ransacks America's past, and takes on the history you grew up with. We bring you untold stories about resistance, covert operations, corruption, mutiny, counterfeiting, antebellum drones, and so much more. And we connect these forgotten struggles to the political battlefield we’re living on right now. The story of the Civil War — the story of slavery, confederate monuments, racism — is the story of America. podcast

    Scene on Radio (Seeing White and Men Series)

     

    Scene on Radio is a podcast that tells stories exploring human experience and American society. Produced and hosted by John Biewen, Scene on Radio comes from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University (CDS) and is distributed by PRX. Seasons 1 and 2 featured a mix of stand-alone episodes as well as multi-episode series, including the Peabody-nominated Seeing White series with collaborator Chenjerai Kumanyika that explored the history and deconstructed the meaning of whiteness. In Season 3, Biewen and co-host Celeste Headlee took a similar approach with MEN, delving into how we got sexism/patriarchy/misogyny and what we can do about it. Stay tuned for Season 4, and in the meanwhile find Seeing White back at the top of your podcast feed as we rebroadcast the acclaimed series. podcast

    Reconstruction: America After the Civil War

     

    Henry Louis Gates Jr. presents a vital new four-hour documentary series on Reconstruction: America After the Civil War. The series explores the transformative years following the American Civil War, when the nation struggled to rebuild itself in the face of profound loss, massive destruction, and revolutionary social change. The twelve years that composed the post-war Reconstruction era (1865-77) witnessed a seismic shift in the meaning and makeup of our democracy, with millions of former slaves and free black people seeking out their rightful place as equal citizens under the law. Though tragically short-lived, this bold democratic experiment was, in the words of W. E. B. Du Bois, a ‘brief moment in the sun’ for African Americans, when they could advance, and achieve, education, exercise their right to vote, and run for and win public office. Documentary

    Black Panthers Vanguard of the Revolution

     

    In the turbulent 1960s, change was coming to America and the fault lines could no longer be ignored — cities were burning, Vietnam was exploding, and disputes raged over equality and civil rights. A new revolutionary culture was emerging and it sought to drastically transform the system. The Black Panther Party for Self-Defense would, for a short time, put itself at the vanguard of that change. The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution is the first feature-length documentary to explore the Black Panther Party, its significance to the broader American culture, its cultural and political awakening for black people, and the painful lessons wrought when a movement derails. documentary

    Eyes on the Prize

     

    Produced by Blackside, Inc. and nationally broadcast on PBS, this comprehensive 14-part television documentary series about the American Civil Rights Movement utilizes rare historical film and interviews with participants from pivotal moments in the struggle for civil rights. Users are required to log in to view and stream the full collection of videos. Facing History also has an Eyes on the Prize study guide that provides a framework for using the series in classrooms, important primary sources, and guiding questions to help teachers bring the history of the civil rights movement alive. Students may see themselves in the young people of the movement who chose to participate, tapping into their own power to fight for justice and equity. documentary series

    The Danger of a Single Story

     

    Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice -- and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding. Video - Ted Talk

    Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi

     

    The National Book Award winning history of how racist ideas were created, spread, and deeply rooted in American society. Book

    Southern History Across the Color Line by Nell Irvin Painter

     

    In this powerful collection, Painter reaches across the color line to examine how race, gender, class, and individual subjectivity shaped the lives of black and white women and men in the nineteenth- and twentieth-century South. Through six essays, she explores such themes as interracial sex, white supremacy, and the physical and psychological violence of slavery, using insights gleaned from psychology and feminist social science as well as social, cultural, and intellectual history. Book

    My Grandmother's Hands: Racialized Trauma and the Pathway to Mending Our Hearts and Bodies by Resmaa Menakem

     

    My Grandmother's Hands is a call to action for all of us to recognize that racism is not about the head, but about the body, and introduces an alternative view of what we can do to grow beyond our entrenched racialized divide.

    Paves the way for a new, body-centered understanding of white supremacy—how it is literally in our blood and our nervous system.
    Offers a step-by-step solution—a healing process—in addition to incisive social commentary.
    Book

    Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria by Beverly Tatum

     

    Walk into any racially mixed high school and you will see Black, White, and Latino youth clustered in their own groups. Is this self-segregation a problem to address or a coping strategy? Beverly Daniel Tatum, a renowned authority on the psychology of racism, argues that straight talk about our racial identities is essential if we are serious about enabling communication across racial and ethnic divides. These topics have only become more urgent as the national conversation about race is increasingly acrimonious. This fully revised edition is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the dynamics of race in America. Book

    Everyday Acts Against Racism: Raising Children in a Multiracial World by Maureen Reddy

     

    A book of essays by mothers and teachers, Everyday Acts Against Racism examines the effects of racism on our children and communities--and suggests ways we can end our society's racial stratification. Writing from many cultural perspectives, the contributors provide provocative commentaries on the realities of racial intolerance and their own experiences in fighting racism. Book

    So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo

     

    In So You Want to Talk About Race, Ijeoma Oluo guides readers of all races through subjects ranging from intersectionality and affirmative action to "model minorities" in an attempt to make the seemingly impossible possible: honest conversations about race and racism, and how they infect almost every aspect of American life. Book
    Raising White Kids: Bringing Up Children in a Racially Unjust America by Jennifer Harvey and Tim Wise Raising White Kids is for families, churches, educators, and communities who want to equip their children to be active and able participants in a society that is becoming one of the most racially diverse in the world while remaining full of racial tensions. For white people who are committed to equity and justice, living in a nation that remains racially unjust and deeply segregated creates unique conundrums.

    These conundrums begin early in life and impact the racial development of white children in powerful ways. What can we do within our homes, communities and schools? Should we teach our children to be “colorblind”? Or, should we teach them to notice race? What roles do we want to equip them to play in addressing racism when they encounter it? What strategies will help our children learn to function well in a diverse nation?

    Talking about race means naming the reality of white privilege and hierarchy. How do we talk about race honestly, then, without making our children feel bad about being white? Most importantly, how do we do any of this in age-appropriate ways?

    While a great deal of public discussion exists in regard to the impact of race and racism on children of color, meaningful dialogue about and resources for understanding the impact of race on white children are woefully absent. Raising White Kids steps into that void.
    book

    Black America Since MLK: And Still I Rise

     

    Black America Since MLK: And Still I Rise looks at the last five decades of African American history since the major civil rights victories through the eyes of Henry Louis Gates, Jr., exploring the tremendous gains and persistent challenges of these years. Drawing on eyewitness accounts, scholarly analysis and rare archival footage, the series illuminates our recent past and paints a complex and comprehensive portrait of black America since 1965, while raising urgent questions about the future of the African American community — and our nation as a whole Docuseries
    Finding Your Roots (Season 4, Episode 4) Three guests who have helped to redefine Black America in the last decade find their identities challenged as they learn about their family origins. Ava DuVernay traces her stepfather’s roots in Alabama — an inspiration for her breakout film Selma — to his third great-grandfather, a former slave who registered to vote in the same region where Selma took place; however, her biological roots place her family in the Haitian Revolution on the opposite side she expected: as white French slave owners fleeing the revolt. Ta-Nehisi Coates follows the ancestry of his Black Panther father to Virginia, where his fourth great-grandmother saw the transition from slavery to freedom, and his mother’s family to Maryland, where his third great-grandmother had a very different experience of the slave era (she lived in freedom and became a successful property owner). Janet Mock follows the Mock surname to Louisiana, where her third great-grandfather appears to have chosen the name of his white owner, and her maternal roots to Hawaii, where her second great-grandparents were farm laborers and her great-grandmother resisted U.S. encroachment on Hawaiian culture by refusing to learn English. By placing their ancestors’ lives in the larger context of history, our guests gain a deeper appreciation for their family narratives and see how those narratives illustrate the diversity of the black experience — a diversity that is even reflected in their DNA. PBS Television Series

    Lift Us Up, Don't Push Us Out!: Voices from the Front Lines of the Educational Justice Movement by Mark R. Warren and David Goodman

     

    Illuminating the struggles and triumphs of the emerging educational justice movement, this anthology tells the stories of how black and brown parents, students, educators, and their allies are fighting back against systemic inequities and the mistreatment of children of color in low-income communities. It offers a social justice alternative to the corporate reform movement that seeks to privatize public education through expanding charter schools and voucher programs. To address the systemic racism in our education system and in the broader society, the contributors argue that what is needed is a movement led by those most affected by injustice--students of color and their parents--that builds alliances across sectors and with other social justice movements addressing immigration, LGBTQ rights, labor rights, and the school-to-prison pipeline.

    Representing a diverse range of social justice organizations from across the US, including the Chicago Teachers Union and the Genders and Sexualities Alliance Network, the essayists recount their journeys to movement building and offer practical organizing strategies and community-based alternatives to traditional education reform and privatization schemes. Lift Us Up! will outrage, inform, and mobilize parents, educators, and concerned citizens about what is wrong in American schools today and how activists are fighting for and achieving change.
    book

    Something Happened in Our Town: A Child's Story About Racial Injustice by Marianne Celano, PhD

     

    Something Happened in Our Town follows two families — one White, one Black — as they discuss a police shooting of a Black man in their community. The story aims to answer children's questions about such traumatic events, and to help children identify and counter racial injustice in their own lives.

    Includes an extensive Note to Parents and Caregivers with guidelines for discussing race and racism with children, child-friendly definitions, and sample dialogues.
    Children's Book

    My Black Friend Says...: Lessons in Equity, Inclusion, and Cultural Competence by Heather S. Fleming

     

    Written as a series of short essays with pauses for reflection and journaling, MBFS… explores the issue of race in a very practical, inviting, and empowering way. This book will give readers the ability to approach race issues from a position of knowledge and confidence. It teaches readers about the ways in which we develop biases, how to tackle those biases and associated emotions, and how to move forward without shame or fear. Though each essay addresses an individual issue related to inclusion and diversity in our society, the combined knowledge will allow people to see the nuances of racism, discrimination, and advocacy in America. With an appendix of suggested reading materials, study topics, and terms to know, this book provides readers with all they need to begin their journey towards being a better ally for people of color and helping themselves and other become catalysts for change. Book

    Heart and Soul: The Story of America and African Americans by Kadir Nelson

     

    The story of America and African Americans is a story of hope and inspiration and unwavering courage. This is the story of the men, women, and children who toiled in the hot sun picking cotton for their masters; it's about the America ripped in two by Jim Crow laws; it's about the brothers and sisters of all colors who rallied against those who would dare bar a child from an education. It's a story of discrimination and broken promises, determination, and triumphs.

    Told through the unique point of view and intimate voice of a one-hundred-year-old African-American female narrator, this inspiring book demonstrates that in gaining their freedom and equal rights, African Americans helped our country achieve its promise of liberty and justice—the true heart and soul of our nation.
    Book for Families

    Turtle Island: The Story of North America's First People by Yellowhorn & Lowinger

     

    Unlike most books that chronicle the history of Native peoples beginning with the arrival of Europeans in 1492, this book goes back to the Ice Age to give young readers a glimpse of what life was like pre-contact. The title, Turtle Island, refers to a Native myth that explains how North and Central America were formed on the back of a turtle. Based on archeological finds and scientific research, we now have a clearer picture of how the Indigenous people lived. Using that knowledge, the authors take the reader back as far as 14,000 years ago to imagine moments in time. A wide variety of topics are featured, from the animals that came and disappeared over time, to what people ate, how they expressed themselves through art, and how they adapted to their surroundings. The importance of story-telling among the Native peoples is always present to shed light on how they explained their world. The end of the book takes us to modern times when the story of the Native peoples is both tragic and hopeful. Book (age 12+)

    Tell All the Children Our Story: Memories and Mementos of Being Young and Black in America by Tonya Bolden

     

    From the first recorded birth of a black child in Jamestown, through the Revolution, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the fight for civil rights, right on up to the present, the author brings to light how African-American children have worked and played, suffered and rejoiced Book for Families

    A Child's Introduction to African American History: The Experiences, People, and Events That Shaped Our Country by Jabari Asim

     

    Jabari Asim goes beyond what's taught in the classroom to reveal a fact-filled history of African American history through politics, activism, sports, entertainment, music, and much more. You'll follow the road to freedom beginning with the slave trade and the middle passage through the abolitionist movement and the Civil War where many African Americans fought as soldiers. You'll learn how slave songs often contained hidden messages and how a 15-year-old Jamaican-born young man named Clive Campbell helped to create hip-hop in the early 1970's. Book (age 8-12)

    An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz *Also in Young People's Edition

     

    2015 Recipient of the American Book Award

    The first history of the United States told from the perspective of indigenous peoples
    Book + Young People's Edition

    Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah *Also in Young People's Edition

     

    Trevor Noah’s unlikely path from apartheid South Africa to the desk of The Daily Show began with a criminal act: his birth. Trevor was born to a white Swiss father and a black Xhosa mother at a time when such a union was punishable by five years in prison. Living proof of his parents’ indiscretion, Trevor was kept mostly indoors for the earliest years of his life, bound by the extreme and often absurd measures his mother took to hide him from a government that could, at any moment, steal him away. Finally liberated by the end of South Africa’s tyrannical white rule, Trevor and his mother set forth on a grand adventure, living openly and freely and embracing the opportunities won by a centuries-long struggle. Book + Young People's Edition
    Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson *Also in Young People's Edition Bryan Stevenson was a young lawyer when he founded the Equal Justice Initiative, a legal practice dedicated to defending those most desperate and in need: the poor, the wrongly condemned, and women and children trapped in the farthest reaches of our criminal justice system. One of his first cases was that of Walter McMillian, a young man who was sentenced to die for a notorious murder he insisted he didn’t commit. The case drew Bryan into a tangle of conspiracy, political machination, and legal brinksmanship—and transformed his understanding of mercy and justice forever.

    Just Mercy is at once an unforgettable account of an idealistic, gifted young lawyer’s coming of age, a moving window into the lives of those he has defended, and an inspiring argument for compassion in the pursuit of true justice.
    Book + Young People's Edition
    A Different Mirror: A History of Multicultural America by Ronald Takaki *Also in Young People's Edition Upon its first publication, A Different Mirror was hailed by critics and academics everywhere as a dramatic new retelling of our nation's past. Beginning with the colonization of the New World, it recounted the history of America in the voice of the non-Anglo peoples of the United States--Native Americans, African Americans, Jews, Irish Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, and others--groups who helped create this country's rich mosaic culture.

    Now, Ronald Takaki has revised his landmark work and made it even more relevant and important. Among the new additions to the book are:

    --The role of black soldiers in preserving the Union
    --The history of Chinese Americans from 1900-1941
    --An investigation into the hot-button issue of "illegal" immigrants from Mexico
    --A look at the sudden visibility of Muslim refugees from Afghanistan.

    This new edition of A Different Mirror is a remarkable achievement that grapples with the raw truth of American history and examines the ultimate question of what it means to be an American
    Book + Young People's Edition